Been away too long …

It’s been a very long time since I posted anything on this blog. Part of that is because of professional obligations that have taken over my life and part of that has been a lack of energy when it comes to topics. Lately, I have been thinking about getting back into writing — whether that be blog posts here or something more creative, I don’t know yet. I do know that there are a lot of things floating around in my head that I want to get out on paper. Not sure if anyone will read them or not but that’s OK.

It’s the beginning of my vacation for the holidays and I am thinking about so much for which I am thankful. I have a wonderful, supportive husband. My life is full of amazing friends. I have a family that is healthy and happy. I’m professionally blessed with a job I love and volunteer efforts that provide fulfillment. Take a few moments over the next few weeks to think about all that you have in your life and not worry so much about what you don’t have.

In the last week, there have been several unexpected deaths in my circle of friends. All young. All taken far too early. Their deaths have made me think about those things that are truly important — family, friends, faith, etc. Spend time with those people who are especially valuable to your life. Step away from those who bring you down and add unhealthy habits to your life. Life is too short to spend with people who don’t add something to your world.

APR, Leadership and Controversy

I attended part of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) international conference in San logo_apr_60Diego this past weekend. It was an interesting compilation of traditional PR practitioners and those who focus more on new media channels for communicating messages.

One thing I found quite interesting was the discussion held on Saturday during the Assembly regarding APR and whether or not the PRSA national board members should be required to hold this certification.

I’m a big proponent of the APR and serve as co-chair on the Tulsa chapter’s accreditation committee. We’ve put a lot of time and effort into creating a program that has led to approximately a dozen new APRs over the past four or five years. For a chapter of about 100 people, we have a disproportionately high percentage of APRs with nearly 30 individuals who have passed the exam.

For an organization like PRSA to even question whether or not the APR should be required bothered me. If we as PR professionals expect for the APR to be considered credible in the business world, then we have to lead the way in encouraging our members to earn the certification. The APR process is not about making someone a better leader or giving them the ability to govern an association, but it is about creating a strategically minded PR professional who can represent our industry well at the local, regional or national level. If PRSA as a whole cannot support its’ members in the APR process by requiring the certification of its’ highest leadership then why should we expect anyone outside the industry to respect or find credibility in what an APR can bring to the PR world.

I’ve said this before, but the APR process is not necessarily about earning more money or creating a veil of mystery around what we do. Instead it’s about personal growth and professional development. The exam steps provide a great deal of learning than anyone truly understands until they have gone through the process. As an accreditation leader at the chapter level, I find that APR candidates come into the process expecting one thing but always leave with a new appreciation for the PR industry as a whole and a more defined understanding of the business world, which translates into making them smart PR practitioners.

What do you think?